Tag Archives: domestic violence

For the love of sweet ancient baby alien space monkey Jebus, this will teach me to stick my nose in other people’s business

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For the love of sweet ancient baby alien space monkey Jebus, this will teach me to stick my nose in other people’s business

Back in December, during my sworn off from Facebook month and a half of grieving,  I came home to find my neighbor who I am to this day convinced was a meth head engaged in battery against someone who did not live with her but I had seen there. I don’t remember all the details really, but doing my mandatory reporting and sick of their BS duty, I called it in. Today, I get a bloody subpoena in the mail to testify against who I am only aware of being a victim.

Are you freaking kidding me?

Now I have to go to court at 8 am on MY day off.

Now I have to testify in court.

Now I have to try to remember details.

Now I have to go to the police department and ask for my report so I can remember wtf happened. I don’t know. I don’t remember. I didn’t realize doing the right thing as a neighbor required me to know what happened indeterminately. Damnit.

Sometimes it just doesn’t pay to interfere.

But I am going to be a social worker. Am I required to save the world and report everything? Yes. I have to try. With great power comes great responsibility. And I suppose that means being subpoenaed. Damnit.

I hope he plea bargains. Or they realize that I have nothing to add to their case against HIM. I only saw HER hit him. Why am I being called as a witness against HIM? Oy.

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What the hell is wrong with people today? Really? DV is not ok.

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What the hell is wrong with people today? Really? DV is not ok.

Last night I thoroughly enjoyed 70% of the Grammys. I did however comment throughout the night on twitter and Facebook about the fact that I find it somewhat odd that Chris Brown seems to have redeemed himself in the eyes of the world, even though we all saw pictures of what he did. Mel Gibson is still a PR disaster and Hollywood pariah, even though we only heard his crazy rants and he is alleged to have hit his baby mama. Chris Brown was allowed to perform two times last night and even won a Grammy. Are you kidding?

Now, I admit I am perhaps a little hypocritical in that I enjoy Mel Gibson movies and use a lot of Charlie Sheenisms; he after all locked a hooker in a closet, participated in drug fueled mutual combat with his baby mama and shot Kelly Preston once upon a time. But I don’t encourage my children to emulate them.

So what pisses me off more about Chris Brown? What filled my Twitter feed last night? What was I shared with on Facebook?

This:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/mjs538/horrible-reactions-to-chris-brown-at-the-grammys

So am I to believe we forgive violent actions faster and easier than hateful words? I do not get it. Both are terrible. Both are disgusting. Both contribute to cycles that I believe we have been trying desperately to end. This isn’t just a female issue either. Females aren’t the only victims of Domestic Violence and men aren’t the only perpetrators.  But what are we showing kids? That if you are a good dancer you can do this:

and get a Grammy?

I think the Grammy Foundation really screwed up. But what do I know.

I do know that:

  1. One in every four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime.
  2. An estimated 1.3 million women are victims of physical assault by an intimate partner each year.
  3. 85% of domestic violence victims are women.
  4. Historically, females have been most often victimized by someone they knew.
  5. Females who are 20-24 years of age are at the greatest risk of nonfatal intimate partner violence.
  6. Most cases of domestic violence are never reported to the police.
  7. Almost one-third of female homicide victims that are reported in police records are killed by an intimate partner.
  8. In 70-80% of intimate partner homicides, no matter which partner was killed, the man physically abused the woman before the murder.
  9. Less than one-fifth of victims reporting an injury from intimate partner violence sought medical treatment following the injury.
  10. Intimate partner violence results in more than 18.5 million mental health care visits each year.
  11. Domestic violence is one of the most chronically under-reported crimes.

So if it is underreported, how many really happen? how many are female vs. man, female vs. female, or male vs male? This is an issue that cuts across all ages, cultures, genders, sexual orientations, and socioeconomic statuses. This is not something we should be celebrating. If Chris Brown has gone to classes and “recovered,” great. Good for him. But out of respect for Rihanna, out of respect for kids looking for role models, please go away.

I digressed from my original intent. Oops.

Not totally removed from the girls I previously spoke of that picked the Patriots because of how the QB looked, we now have girls saying that because someone is a good dancer and because he is good-looking, they would let him “beat them.” I guess we forgive actions faster than words, especially if you are young and hot.

Are you fucking kidding me?

Had any of you girls ever had a man hit you, saw your mom get hit, had to deal with the aftermath, physical or emotional of an abusive relationship or had a lick of sense in you, you would never say such asinine things. Get a clue. FUCK

http://www.ncadv.org/files/DomesticViolenceFactSheet(National).pdf

Oh, the places you will go!~Dr. Seuss

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Oh, the places you will go!~Dr. Seuss

So I went to the placement fair to try and figure out some of the potential places for my clinical practicum…I narrowed it down to 6 places and they all make my heart glow:

Check them out:

Mission: To prevent HIV infections, support and empower people affected and infected by HIV/AIDS, and eliminate HIV/AIDS-related stigma.

http://cascadeaids.org/

Mission:

Our mission is to help homeless youth and other marginalized people move towards improved health and self-sufficiency. We are…

  • Service providers and advocates.
  • Experts in understanding adolescents.
  • A Federally Qualified Health Center.
  • A licensed Mental Health Agency.
  • Leaders in serving GLBTQ youth.

We believe…

  • In dignity, hope, and resiliency.
  • In innovation.
  • Our clients can get through current challenges.
  • Young people need trusting adults to thrive.
  • In meeting people where they are.
  • In a strengths-based approach.

http://www.outsidein.org/

Mission: The Bradley Angle mission is to offer survivors of domestic and sexual violence options for safety, empowerment, healing and hope, while collaborating with our communities to create social change.

As we work to bring an end to domestic violence, Bradley Angle embraces the following values:

  • We empower individuals and communities to take action and eliminate domestic violence from their lives.
  • We are committed to demystifying domestic violence and to giving voice to those touched by it.
  • We offer a safe, non-judgmental and welcoming environment for all domestic violence survivors, offering individualized services that meet a wide range of cultural and personal needs.
  • We believe all people, regardless of race, age, gender identity, background, sexual orientation or religion, deserve to live in a world where physical, emotional, and sexual abuse are not tolerated.

http://bradleyangle.org/

Mission: The mission of NARA, NW is to provide education, physical and mental health services and substance abuse treatment that is culturally appropriate to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other vulnerable populations.

http://www.naranorthwest.org/

Mission: In partnership with the communities we serve, the Health Department assures, promotes and protects the health of the people of Multnomah County.

  • We believe that health is a “state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” (World Health Organization, 1978)
  • We honor the diversity of the individuals and communities we serve and value their differing approaches to health and well-being.
  • We believe in partnerships to improve the health of our communities.
  • We believe the department’s actions should assist our communities in addressing underlying factors that affect good health.
  • We value effective leadership as a fundamental tool to improve the health of our communities.
  • We believe in being responsible stewards of the public trust and resources.
  • We value a diverse staff and believe our staff should be selected with care, treated with respect, held accountable for their performance and encouraged in their personal growth.
  • We believe in continuously improving the quality of our work.
  • We believe in balancing scientific knowledge and practical experience with the wisdom and beliefs of those we serve to improve the health of our communities.
  • We emphasize prevention, health promotion and early intervention.

http://web.multco.us/health

Mission: Honor America’s veterans by providing exceptional health care that improves their health and well-being.

http://www.portland.va.gov/vancouver.asp

I love that some places are beginning to transition and recognize different populations than they have traditionally, i.e. domestic violence shelters are beginning to recognize, anticipate and serve men and LGBTQ2S populations.

I am so excited to be able to do this part of my education out of Idaho.

No news yet on whether the VA will have any LGBTQ2S services but eventually they have to. I hope 🙂